Frequent question: Can I get a breast reduction if I’m overweight?

Being overweight is a relative contraindication to ( an important reason to be cautious or to avoid)having breast reduction. If you are a few kilos above your ideal body weight there is no issue at all. … Once you are significantly overweight your risk of having a complication after any procedure increase.

What are the signs that you need a breast reduction?

What are the symptoms of needing a breast reduction?

  • Chronic shoulder, back, and neck pain requiring pain medications.
  • Grooves or marks on the shoulders from bra straps.
  • Nerve pain.
  • Poor self-image due to large breasts.
  • Chronic rash or skin irritation underneath the breasts.
  • Restricted activity due to large breasts, such as exercise.
  • Difficulty fitting into bras and clothing.

How much do you have to weigh to get breast reduction?

Body mass index (BMI).

Some insurance companies will deny breast reduction surgery unless the BMI is <30, others <35, while others need to see documentation that the patient has attempted to lose weight in the past through diet, exercise or weight loss surgery. This is because breast size may decrease with weight loss.

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Why do you have to lose weight before breast reduction surgery?

Losing weight before a breast reduction surgery is very important for a number of reasons. If you have a breast reduction and then lose weight, your breast may decrease in size particularly if there were a significant percentage of fat content initially.

Should I get a breast reduction or lift?

Most women get a breast reduction when their large breasts cause neck, shoulder, or back pain and inhibit their ability to exercise. Alternately, a breast lift raises the breasts by eliminating excess skin and reshaping the remaining breast tissue resulting in a more youthful and upright appearance.

Do you regret your breast reduction?

Having a breast reduction was the best thing I ever did and I will never regret it. It was by far the easiest surgery I have had with very little pain and downtime. I had no complications, minimal scarring, and didn’t lose any sensation.

Will a breast reduction make me look thinner?

In the end, most patients who get a sizeable reduction can look like they lost 20 pounds without having done anything at all. This is similar to the effect of removing a double chin through liposuction.

How much do DDD cup breast weigh?

between 15 and 23 pounds

How many cup sizes can you lose in a breast reduction?

two cup sizes

Do breast reductions grow back?

Most patients have a permanent reduction of breast size after surgery. Although not common, on occasion breast tissue can grow back after breast reduction. … These patients may notice their breasts enlarge later in life after a pregnancy, starting birth control pills, gaining weight or even undergoing menopause.

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Is Breast Reduction major or minor surgery?

Breast reduction surgery has the same risks as any other type of major surgery — bleeding, infection and an adverse reaction to the anesthesia. Other possible risks include: Bruising, which is usually temporary.

How much do breasts weigh?

For many women, this has been a burdensome trend. A pair of D-cup breasts weighs between 15 and 23 pounds — the equivalent of carrying around two small turkeys. The larger the breasts, the more they move and the greater the discomfort.

DO breasts sag after breast reduction?

Know that your breasts will continue to age – right along with the rest of your body – even after surgery. Even so, your breasts will be smaller and in a better position. They won’t sag as they would without the surgery. … Slack to learn if breast reduction surgery is right for you.

Does a breast lift reduce your cup size?

PHILADELPHIA — After undergoing breast lift surgery (mastopexy), women may find themselves wearing a smaller bra—with an average decrease of one bra cup size, reports a study in the July issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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